DJ three at burning man interview with husa sounds 2016 montreal salon daome aim festival fabric london closing doors hallucienda

DJ Three Talks AIM, Fabric & More [ Interview ]

DJ Three has been an admired figure for many since he emerged from the Florida underground electronic music scene in the 90’s. He continues to climb the success ladder with countless great achievement. His cutting edge house & techno sound that goes beyond keeps turning heads until this day.  Last week, Husa Sounds had the great honor to discuss a few things with Dj Three & we wrote it all down for all our readers.  Read the full interview below.


Thank you for taking the time to talk to us. We think our readers will really enjoy this one! Tell us what out of your everyday life reflects the most on the music you play?

I think mostly the state of my immediate surroundings. Today is a perfect example, as I’m down in Florida, the weather is beautiful and pleasant.  When it comes to DJing and I’m on the road, it’s the destination itself that tends to be the influence. If I land in Chicago for example, I am immediately thinking about how the city’s musical history relates to me and that has a certain influence my energy and how I would play.

From your experience having attended many festivals, what is the direction they are headed towards nowadays ?

I think in the past couple of years, the movement has definitely been towards the boutique festivals.  It began more as a west coast phenomenon from ‘Desert Hearts’ to ‘Lighting in a Bottle’. Those kind of festivals are perhaps more carefully curated.  You end up getting longer DJ sets rather than just a long list of DJs playing one hour sets.  That said, it’s been good to see underground stages start to really become a legit thing for the mega festivals like ‘EDC’ and ‘ULTRA’ but, because of the nature of the shorter sets, it gets to a point where it becomes “main stage underground”.  The audience expects more “WOW” factor within a short set. Those bigger festivals could probably benefit by adding a smaller stage or VIP area where fewer DJs play but for a longer period of time.  As the time goes by I think that the audiences there will only get better, but while these bigger festivals have taken forward thinking steps by adding underground stages i really think it’s time to expand further this way.


Its unfortunate the weather was not on our side the first year of AIM Festival, therefore it was raining during your set… How can you describe your experience?

The AIM weather really took its time towards getting worse, too. It started off just a drizzle eventually then a torrential downpour. The beauty of it all is that people seemingly had a complete blast anyway.  At the end of the day, the music surely prevailed, didn’t it?  I played at the Multi Culti stage with Thomas Von Party and it was kind of hidden away behind a cluster of trees that gave way to a little green field. We made the best of it in spite of the weather, people stuck around and I DJ’d for hours.  It’s really exciting to come back to Montreal for the AIM crew this weekend.

Can you tell us a little history on how “Hallucienda” came about?

It goes back to the beginning of the 90’s, Hallucination Recordings was the first label and that was started by David Christophere and DJ Monk of “Rabbit in the Moon”. I was involved through that decade, did some remixes then, and did a record called “Second Hand Satellites” with Sean Q6.  So, from 1992 to 2002 there was Hallucination Recordings, then I launched “Hallucination Limited” in 2002 and that ran that until 2012.  The first two labels had 10 year cycles I decided to hit the reset button again and start Hallucienda.  Threading the needle, so to speak.

Can we expect any productions coming from you in the near future?

Yes, I don’t tend to speak about what’s coming up but I just signed a record called “Theme From Madchester” to Visionquest which should be coming out by Spring of next year.  Otherwise, I’ve been spending a lot of time for the past 2 years in an executive producer role helping develop a few artist albums that are coming on “Hallucienda”.   So, outside of the constant DJ-ing I’ve just been keeping a low profile behind the scenes getting a very heavy release schedule ready that will start in early 2017.

How does “Fabric” closing its doors the the public make you feel knowing you’ve made several appearances in this venue?

I’ve been keeping away from posting any heart-felt eulogies of my time with the club because I feel this is still a fight that can be won.  The club is working diligently on the fight to win their appeal and there’s solid proof now that this was more about real estate than the case that was brought against the them.  Even if I didn’t have a long history playing for the club and an emotional attachment it would still resonate with me.  If they can do it to Fabric, they can do it to anyone or anything that is in their way.  So, this affects everyone; not just clubbers.  Having said that, yeah the possibility of losing the club forever is heartbreaking.  My first overseas gig was for Fabric, I think 2002, and I’ve played for them nearly every year since.  I remember playing at the 15 Year Anniversary 2 years ago and thinking about how magnificent and unique it was to that specific club. The jovial spirit and sets being played just weren’t something you would see at any other venue.   The culture of, in and around fabric is truly something special.


If you reside in Montreal or are simply visiting , you can catch a AIM Festival hosted party with Dj Three alongside HOOPALAÏ at Le Salon Daomé this upcoming Friday November 04th 2016. Click HERE for more info

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